Iowa City Stories

May 9, 2010

Recycling To Go Further in the Future for UI Residence Halls

Without Recycling

Many Things discarded in the East side Residence Halls can be recycled

Most Iowa City neighborhoods have been recycling for years, but there has been one big exception.  University of Iowa residence halls are just now “going green,” implementing a new program that encourages students to recycle at every dorm across campus.  Most students see it as a welcome and overdue change.

Currently, west side neighborhood residence halls Quadrangle, Rienow, Slater, and Hillcrest all have blue bins located throughout the buildings for students to dispose of their plastic, paper, and bottle waste.  So far students in this neighborhood are very appreciative of the blue bins, and don’t find separating their trash to be an extra chore.

“It was more annoying not to have one, bottles aren’t filling up your garbage.  We had a bag for water bottles anyway,” said freshman Delanie McAndrews, who lives in Rienow Hall.

While students are enjoying this program on the west side of campus, students on the other side of the river are still throwing out their trash the old-fashioned way.  Recycling bins are noticeably absent from the east side residence halls of Currier, Burge, Stanley, and Daum.  However, there is a plan to implement the new recycling program beginning in the Fall 2010 semester.

The Roadblocks

Students on the East side of campus have wanted a recycling program just as much as the students on the West side, but their frustration will last a few more months.  It has left students like Currier resident Jim Duff asking, ‘what’s the holdup?’

“I don’t recycle anything right now because I don’t have the option,” says  Duff.  “I don’t think it would cost that much.”

But according to the University, a full-scale recycling program is expensive and complex.  “While it may seem pretty simple to offer these receptacles throughout the residence halls, it’s more difficult than it may seem,” says  Dr. Von Stange, the director of University of Iowa residence services.  He wanted to implement a recycling program as a small test in order to gauge the resources necessary to successfully move to a full-scale recycling program for thousands of students.  Stange said, “We needed to make sure we were doing it well, and that our vendor, City Carton and their collectors could handle the recycling going on.  It could mean adding additional routes.”

Dr. Stange said he isn’t trying to delay a move to go green on campus, and he understands the desire of students to do their part to recycle.  Stange said he also sees the environmental need to implement recycling at University residence halls.   While all those are good goals, he said, diverting tons of potential trash to a separate stream of recyclables has to be accomplished so it’s effective, economical and so the program can be managed by current staff.   Stange says that’s no easy task – and it’s taken a long time to get this far.

When Dr.  Stange started his job of Director of Residence Services six years ago one of the first issues he was confronted with concerned a recycling program.  He says at that time there wasn’t a recycling system good enough to handle all the residence hall garbage.  Not only that, there was no idea how much a recycling program would cost to put in place.   “We needed to know what it was going to take to establish this financially,” said Stange.  Dr. Stange estimates it may cost $3,000 to implement the program, but ultimately, it’s too soon to say how much it will cost altogether.

Putting a Plan into Action

It takes more than money to make a recycling program work.  Dr.  Stange says he understood from the beginning that the program was going to need the cooperation of the people who have been asking for it: the students living in residence halls.

Rather than raise room and board fees for students by $50 a semester to pay for recycling, Stange came up with the idea of employing students as  workers in the new recycling program.  While some students were recruited for part-time recycling jobs, there are also additional temporary positions in place to make sure things run smoothly during the test period.   By being a little creative in shuffling the staff to meet the demands of the new recycling plan, Stange says the University may be able to avoid raising room and board fees at the residence halls.

However, there may still be a fee to pay at the end of the year.  No one knows exactly how much money it’s going to cost to collect and process the recyclable waste generated by the dorms.  The worst case scenario, says Stange, is that students might have to pay an additional fee to keep the program up and running, but he expects it would be less than $50 a year.

So, why did it take so long to get recycling going in the first place?  “The hold up was making sure we had the facilities, the staffing, and the vendors to help do this,” said Stange.

Looking to the Future

Now that the pilot recycling program is operating in the west side dorms, Stange says it also uncovered a few other snags.  Students had to be trained and reminded how to properly recycle.   Some residence hall staff were very conscientious, said Stange, and others were “hit and miss” when it came to enforcing new recycling rules and reminding students.  Developing the recycling habit will be a constant effort because each year there is a new crop of dorm residents who must learn the system.

Nonetheless, Dr. Stange still plans to move forward, and put the program in the east side residence halls next year, and the larger apartment based halls, Parklawn and Mayflower, too.   The program will remain labor intensive, and it could even spawn some new jobs as recycling is extended across campus.  “One of the things we’re looking at is the student labor at this point, and hiring full time custodial staff to increase management,” said Dr. Stange.

Still, it’s anyone’s guess as to exactly how much this could all add up to by the end of 2010 when the recycling program becomes more widespread, and more management jobs are added to keep it running smoothly.  Students, however, seem to think it is money well spent.  They see the benefit of recycling versus throwing everything in the trash.

“It’s interesting to see it change form then to now.  I’m glad its there, cause it is something I use,” said Bret Scofeild, a resident living in Quadrangle.

The easiest solution, says Stange, may not be the best solution in the end.  The simplest and cheapest thing to do was to ignore recycling.  “Financially we found we could throw our trash away instead of recycling.  But as an institution of higher learning it’s the right thing to do, not because it’s the most financially prudent model.  I think we’ll find a program down the road that is strong, but not without some bumps in the road first.”

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