Iowa City Stories

May 14, 2010

The University of Iowa’s Network (ResNet) and Fiber Optic

Students living in residence halls at the University of Iowa have it good when it comes to the speed of their internet.

While non-University residents may have to pay an extra-fee to receive ultra-high speed internet, the University provides its own network for students living in residence halls, and at all University computer locations.  What’s best is the charge is included with tuition.

Ashley Stover, a recent graduate of the University of Iowa remembers when she moved into the dorms her freshman year and booted up her computer.

“It was so much faster than what I had back home,” said Stover.  “My parents the old-school dial up modem, so it was really slow.  Not to mention it tied up the phone line too, so if I wanted to talk to my boyfriend on the phone, it couldn’t be while anyone else was on the computer.  The only thing I didn’t like about it was I got in trouble for downloading songs, but I can’t blame the University for that one.  I have since started to pay for my music when I got iTunes.”

Rules and Acceptable Policies

A row of computers at the ITC in the Main Library connected to ResNet

While the University network may be extremely fast, there are strict guidelines that users must follow when connecting to the network.  According to the University housing website, the following rules are the acceptable use policy.

  • Student is responsible for all activity originating from this connection. Student must take reasonable precautions to prevent unauthorized use by others of this connection, and his/her accounts, programs, or data.
  • Students should not engage in activities that consume excessive amounts of network bandwidth.
  • Student must not modify or extend Residence Hall network services and wiring. This applies to all network wiring, hardware, and in-room jacks. The only device you can connect is a personal computer. You may not connect servers of any type, hubs, or network printers.
  • Residence Hall connections are provided for individual use only. Student may not create accounts on his/her computing system that provide campus network access for anyone else.
  • Residence Hall connections are for University-related activities only. Student may not conduct a commercial business via the Residence Hall connection.
  • Student may not run sniffers or any other software or hardware designed to intercept packets or to disrupt the security or operation of the campus network.
  • Student may not participate in illegal activities such as software piracy—either the distribution of copyrighted software or illegal attainment of software or other copyrighted materials—from the Residence Hall connection.
  • Student may not host chat lines from computers connected to this network.

Capable of high speeds

According to Jay Ford, Senior Network Engineer of ITS-Telecommunication & Network Services, the network is capable of some extreme speeds.

“I’ll give you four different scenarios and each one has a different speed capability,” said Ford.  “We have speeds up to 10 Gbps externally (to Chicago and Kansas City.)  10 Gbps mesh within the core of the campus network among key routing locations and data centers.  1 Gbps to and within most buildings, and 1 Gbps to most user jacks.”

With speeds this fast, it comes as no surprise that fiber optic technology is utilized within the network.  I discussed earlier how fiber optic works, and how local internet companies are implementing fiber optic, and the University is no different.

“We already use fiber heavily within the network,” said Ford.  “Fiber to edge user devices is not required because we can provide 1 Gbps on copper, which is much cheaper and better supported in user equipment.”

Ford also added that the University’s network is often times faster than Mediacom.

“Our standard user service is 1 Gbps, full-duplex and symmetric,” said Ford.  “Service offered by ISPs like Mediacom and Qwest is usually in the 3-20 Mbps range, usually full-duplex but often slower in one direction than the other.”

However the University does not plan charge users andoffer ResNet as an option for internet service to non-resident hall students like Mediacom does.

Kirk Baruth, Communcations Specialist at the University IT services, said the University pondered the idea, but decided against it.

“We’ve pondered it in the past on a few occasions,” said Baruth, “But delivering network connectivity to off-campus residences gets pretty far afield from our core mission. Instead, we maintain sufficient external connectivity so we don’t have a problem reaching ISPs that do provide residential access.”

While students at the university are not able to access the internet if they are not in a residence hall or the university-based computer, for those that do use the network on a daily basis, the speed of the network is on par and higher than anything else they can get for the price.

May 13, 2010

Diversity: Iowa City and the University of Iowa

Filed under: IC Stories: Avery, Diversity, Iowa City Stories — Tags: , , — a1os4wrds @ 12:05 pm

The Iowa City community has been facing some huge issues concerning diversity.
First the idea of the high schools district lines being redrawn, and secondly a new Chief Diversity officer at the University of Iowa.
The Chief Diversity Officer will be the figure head of diversity at the University and something that all candidates agree on is the fact that they cannot solve Iowa’s issue with diversity by themselves.
“Don’t hire me and expect wipe your hands and say now this is your problem…cause it won’t work.” Said candidate Terryl Ross Director for Community and Diversity.
A big part of solving the diversity issue in Iowa City as well as the University of Iowa is having the community behind the issue.
Katherine Betts Assistant Director of Diversity Programs of Cultural Centers believes that the community plays a pivotal role in increasing diversity here at Iowa.
“The community must be accepting of diverse students…and I think that’s something that many students don’t feel in the community. I mean just look at the issues of our high schools.”
With the Iowa City community and the University of Iowa so closely connected if diversity is failing in one it is most likely failing in the other.
Rene Rocha a professor at the University of Iowa thinks that in order to change the diversity in the Iowa City community, kids must be introduced at a young age to different cultures.
Rocha believes, “that many students come from Iowa with this lack of cultural acceptance simply because they are not exposed to it in their hometowns.”
In order for the diversity problem to be solved officials believe that diverse students that come into the high schools or even the University must feel that they have some type of cohesiveness with one another as well as their environment.
Nicole Nisly the Interim Chief Diversity Officer believes this to be an important part of any successful diversity program.
“If students come in and don’t feel they have someone there to rely on, they aren’t going to stick around,” said Nisly “there has to be some level of acceptance and cohesiveness between the students and the community.”
The question then becomes who will become an example of a successful diversity program first the University of Iowa or the Iowa City high schools?
Nisly said, “It’s going to take a lot of time, nothing is going to happen overnight. The state is 90 percent white, its going to take a lot patience and persistence on everyone’s part.
And this is something Chief Diversity officer candidate Ross believes in also.
“We have to be prepared for the long run, sure there are going to be bumps in the road and the true test will be where we stand after we hit those bumps.”

Safety in the wake of 21-only

When the 21-ordinance in Iowa City takes effect on June 1, thousands of underage bar-goers will find themselves without a weekend refuge.

There has been much speculation about where the young party crowd will choose to spend their nights when they can no longer hang out downtown. Many have suggested that the city’s neighborhoods will see a spike in the number of house parties. Others have said that residence hall personnel will have their hands full dealing with the increase of UI students drinking in the dorms. And still others say people will stop visiting Iowa City altogether.

Whatever the case may be, the Iowa City Police Department and UI Department of Public Safety will need to adapt to new and perhaps unforeseen challenges.

The rise of the house party?

House parties around the UI campus are few and far between due to the city’s vibrant downtown bar scene. But under the new ordinance, the “they’ll just drink somewhere else” argument says all signs point to an impending rise in the number of house parties.

UI Department of Public Safety

UI police vehicles outside the UI Department of Public Safety in the Old Capitol Mall

But police officials are not convinced.

Iowa City police Sgt. Denise Brotherton said only time will tell if students and others truly do migrate to the neighborhoods.

“We won’t know until it happens,” Brotherton said. “There’s always house parties, we’ll just have to see if the 21-ordinance increases that.”

Charles Green, the assistant vice president for UI police, echoed Brotherton’s uncertainty.

“It’s an unknown,” Green said. “We really don’t know what the impact is going to be.”

And while it remains to be seen, those who believe the increase is imminent say the police will be unable to control partiers once they are spread out across the neighborhoods.

Brotherton said although a reallocation of resources might be necessary, the idea that house parties are harder to control than the centralized downtown area is unfounded.

“We go to a house party, it’s just a house party. We can shut it down,” Brotherton said. “There’s more we can do to control it out there.”

Downtown is not dead

So while neighborhood parties remain a concern that both departments will monitor closely, the downtown area will not be without its police presence.

Green said UI police will continue to work alongside the ICPD, but that their primary concern would be closer to university interests.

“What happens in the outlying neighborhoods will be the concern of the Iowa City Police Department,” Green said. “Our focus will be the downtown area.”

During most of last year UI police officers put in substantial overtime in the downtown area to combat violence in the Pedestrian Mall. Green said this year the department also added a regular shift to the downtown area on Wednesday through Saturday nights even before any discussion of the 21-ordinance had begun.

Recently the Iowa City Downtown Association announced that eight surveillance cameras would be installed in the Pedestrian Mall to add extra security to the area.

Brotherton said the cameras could be a benefit for police during times when information about an incident is limited.

“It’s a good positive step,” Brotherton said. “Anything is an assistance to us.”

Green also said the cameras could benefit the department’s operations but said it’s often difficult to accurately identify an individual because of the poor video quality and said the effectiveness of the cameras acting as a deterrent to crime would vary for each individual.

Getting home safe

Another public safety concern has always been what happens to people after they leave the downtown area and head for home. With people potentially going to more house parties as a result of the 21-ordinance, some people are worried about the safety of dark neighborhood streets away from the busy downtown area.

Apart from taxis, the UI offers a Cambus Saferide service that runs until 2:25 am on Friday and Saturday nights. The UI Department of Public Safety also offers a Nite Ride van service that operates until 3:00 a.m. Thursday through Saturday.

But ever since Nite Ride was first introduced there has been controversy over the fact that the service is only available to women. Many people have argued that the service should be expanded to include safe transportation for men.

Former UI Student Government President Mike Currie succeeded in extending the service’s hours during finals week last winter, but was unsuccessful in achieving his main goal of establishing a male Nite Ride.

UI sophomore Evan Willhite is among the supporters of a male Nite Ride and said the issue is more about safety than equality.

“Some type of transportation should be available for males as well as women,” Willhite said. “The university should do everything it can to maintain the safety of its students.”

Green said an Eastside Saferide Loop through the neighborhood close to campus was added in September in direct response to the calls for a male transportation service.

Green said he was unsure how much use the new route is getting, but said the department’s plans are firm.

“We have no plans to expand Nite Ride,” Green said.

Safety is personal

Both Green and Brotherton said their departments would continue to do everything in their power to keep Iowa City residents safe in the aftermath of the 21-ordinance, but stressed the need for people to take responsibility for their own safety.

Brotherton suggested traveling in groups to avoid conflicts on the walks home from house parties and said it’s important to be aware of how much you’re drinking and recognize potentially harmful situations.

“To me it doesn’t matter if they’re downtown or at a party,” Brotherton said. “If they’re over-consuming, they’re putting themselves in a dangerous situation.”

For a look at some of the health concerns surrounding the 21-ordinance, click here.

May 9, 2010

A Resident Assistant with a Lot of Moxie.

Getting some studying done while he can.

“Well, you have to like people, and you have to be able to put up with a lot of dumb shit, and I mean really dumb stuff,” said Nick Colsch,  as he put down his coffee while reading at the Java House.  It’s all a part of the job of being what students call an “R.A.,” or Resident Assistant in University of Iowa student housing.

Colsch has been an R.A.  for three years,  working in Currier Hall and now Mayflower.   After three years on the frontline, Colsch is full of stories.  One of the more ridiculous experiences he has had to tolerate involved a case of oranges.

“I was compacting trash, and some f***er-resident decided to take out their screen and throw oranges at me.  It’s January.  I saw this orange crushed.  They were throwing oranges from their window,” says Colsch.

Colsch notices a difference in the atmosphere between residence halls.  “In Currier the demographic is radically different than Mayflower.  A lot of kids often sign up for Currier and Hillcrest largely because of the quiet atmosphere.  It’s more of a studying environment.  Mayflower is the last kids to register.  We have a large number of international students.  It’s a zoo more than a residence hall.”

Both residence halls were searched back in April, and at least 13 students from both Currier and Mayflower were found to be in possession of marijuana.  This doesn’t come as any surprise to Nick, who as an R.A. has had to intervene in rooms where students have drugs and alcohol against dorm rules.  “[The] discipline level is a lot worse out in Mayflower, partly because they have kitchens, and can hide stuff.  They want to seem older, so alcohol appeals to them.”

Colsch says the R.A. program has changed since he started working severak years ago.  Instead of being focused on programs or activities for students living in the halls for participation, he says the training relies more on instructing R.A.s how to be more sociable, and have a hospitable presence when talking to students.

However, R.A.s can still use programs if they’d like. “It really depends on your style as an R.A.  Some R.A.’s kind of program like crazy, and the residents like it, and that just works for that floor,” says John Komdat, an R.A. on Currier’s second floor.  Komdat has worked with Colsch before in R.A. training, and says Nick’s style wouldn’t work for everyone. “The way that he makes the job work for him takes intelligence, and intentionality.  He’s a character.  I think most people would agree.”

Favorite movie:

-Joe Dirt

Favorite book:

Lamb by Christopher Moore

Favorite music:

I’ve been getting into really old Motown.  The Four Tops and the Spinners, the Supremes

Favorite activities:

“I’ve been running a lot.”

Favorite food:

Coffee (if you call that a food)

Nick has a wicked sense of humor that gets him through most on-the-job challenges.  He thinks with a little more practice, those irritating residents in Mayflower hurling oranges out the window at him could become “bombers.”  Still, while Nick has a personality that almost any resident can get along with, there is a stereotype that he knows makes him stand out.  Being an R.A., says Nick, “pulls you out of a normal life for a year, because you’re looked at like a fish.  You’re introduced first as an R.A. rather than by your name.”

While Nick says he has enjoyed the experience of being an R.A. he says he feels burned out from the experience and plans to get an apartment next year.  After that, Nick plans to graduate and is optimistic he will find a job in his major:  Accounting.  At least as an accountant, no one should be throwing oranges at him.

Recycling To Go Further in the Future for UI Residence Halls

Without Recycling

Many Things discarded in the East side Residence Halls can be recycled

Most Iowa City neighborhoods have been recycling for years, but there has been one big exception.  University of Iowa residence halls are just now “going green,” implementing a new program that encourages students to recycle at every dorm across campus.  Most students see it as a welcome and overdue change.

Currently, west side neighborhood residence halls Quadrangle, Rienow, Slater, and Hillcrest all have blue bins located throughout the buildings for students to dispose of their plastic, paper, and bottle waste.  So far students in this neighborhood are very appreciative of the blue bins, and don’t find separating their trash to be an extra chore.

“It was more annoying not to have one, bottles aren’t filling up your garbage.  We had a bag for water bottles anyway,” said freshman Delanie McAndrews, who lives in Rienow Hall.

While students are enjoying this program on the west side of campus, students on the other side of the river are still throwing out their trash the old-fashioned way.  Recycling bins are noticeably absent from the east side residence halls of Currier, Burge, Stanley, and Daum.  However, there is a plan to implement the new recycling program beginning in the Fall 2010 semester.

The Roadblocks

Students on the East side of campus have wanted a recycling program just as much as the students on the West side, but their frustration will last a few more months.  It has left students like Currier resident Jim Duff asking, ‘what’s the holdup?’

“I don’t recycle anything right now because I don’t have the option,” says  Duff.  “I don’t think it would cost that much.”

But according to the University, a full-scale recycling program is expensive and complex.  “While it may seem pretty simple to offer these receptacles throughout the residence halls, it’s more difficult than it may seem,” says  Dr. Von Stange, the director of University of Iowa residence services.  He wanted to implement a recycling program as a small test in order to gauge the resources necessary to successfully move to a full-scale recycling program for thousands of students.  Stange said, “We needed to make sure we were doing it well, and that our vendor, City Carton and their collectors could handle the recycling going on.  It could mean adding additional routes.”

Dr. Stange said he isn’t trying to delay a move to go green on campus, and he understands the desire of students to do their part to recycle.  Stange said he also sees the environmental need to implement recycling at University residence halls.   While all those are good goals, he said, diverting tons of potential trash to a separate stream of recyclables has to be accomplished so it’s effective, economical and so the program can be managed by current staff.   Stange says that’s no easy task – and it’s taken a long time to get this far.

When Dr.  Stange started his job of Director of Residence Services six years ago one of the first issues he was confronted with concerned a recycling program.  He says at that time there wasn’t a recycling system good enough to handle all the residence hall garbage.  Not only that, there was no idea how much a recycling program would cost to put in place.   “We needed to know what it was going to take to establish this financially,” said Stange.  Dr. Stange estimates it may cost $3,000 to implement the program, but ultimately, it’s too soon to say how much it will cost altogether.

Putting a Plan into Action

It takes more than money to make a recycling program work.  Dr.  Stange says he understood from the beginning that the program was going to need the cooperation of the people who have been asking for it: the students living in residence halls.

Rather than raise room and board fees for students by $50 a semester to pay for recycling, Stange came up with the idea of employing students as  workers in the new recycling program.  While some students were recruited for part-time recycling jobs, there are also additional temporary positions in place to make sure things run smoothly during the test period.   By being a little creative in shuffling the staff to meet the demands of the new recycling plan, Stange says the University may be able to avoid raising room and board fees at the residence halls.

However, there may still be a fee to pay at the end of the year.  No one knows exactly how much money it’s going to cost to collect and process the recyclable waste generated by the dorms.  The worst case scenario, says Stange, is that students might have to pay an additional fee to keep the program up and running, but he expects it would be less than $50 a year.

So, why did it take so long to get recycling going in the first place?  “The hold up was making sure we had the facilities, the staffing, and the vendors to help do this,” said Stange.

Looking to the Future

Now that the pilot recycling program is operating in the west side dorms, Stange says it also uncovered a few other snags.  Students had to be trained and reminded how to properly recycle.   Some residence hall staff were very conscientious, said Stange, and others were “hit and miss” when it came to enforcing new recycling rules and reminding students.  Developing the recycling habit will be a constant effort because each year there is a new crop of dorm residents who must learn the system.

Nonetheless, Dr. Stange still plans to move forward, and put the program in the east side residence halls next year, and the larger apartment based halls, Parklawn and Mayflower, too.   The program will remain labor intensive, and it could even spawn some new jobs as recycling is extended across campus.  “One of the things we’re looking at is the student labor at this point, and hiring full time custodial staff to increase management,” said Dr. Stange.

Still, it’s anyone’s guess as to exactly how much this could all add up to by the end of 2010 when the recycling program becomes more widespread, and more management jobs are added to keep it running smoothly.  Students, however, seem to think it is money well spent.  They see the benefit of recycling versus throwing everything in the trash.

“It’s interesting to see it change form then to now.  I’m glad its there, cause it is something I use,” said Bret Scofeild, a resident living in Quadrangle.

The easiest solution, says Stange, may not be the best solution in the end.  The simplest and cheapest thing to do was to ignore recycling.  “Financially we found we could throw our trash away instead of recycling.  But as an institution of higher learning it’s the right thing to do, not because it’s the most financially prudent model.  I think we’ll find a program down the road that is strong, but not without some bumps in the road first.”

April 1, 2010

Residence Halls Consider the 21 Ordinance



The ARH is looking for help from students for improvement, and positions for next semester.

They could be new lyrics to an old tune: “How you gonna keep ‘em down at the dorm after they’ve seen the bars?”

With one more reading, The Iowa City City Council is poised to pass the so-called 21-ordinance for Iowa City bars.  It would restrict people under 21 from being in downtown bars after 10 p.m.  The city council is under pressure to curb student binge drinking, and proponents of the ordinance say it’s a step in the right direction.

But it’s an unpopular idea with students under the age of 21 who frequently go out to the bars on Thursday nights or weekends to socialize.  Students have argued to the UI student council that preventing underage students from entering a bar after 10 p.m.  will simply make them go to house parties or other places in Iowa City to find alcohol and drink.

Enter the Associated Residence Halls

With thousands of under-aged drinkers under their roofs, campus dorms are ground zero for the movement opposing the 21 ordinance.  It’s not that the UI doesn’t try to keep dorm residents sober and out of trouble.  Activities sponsored by the University have always been in place around campus to offer alcohol free alternatives to hanging out at the bars.  The Associated Residence Halls group has sponsored events in the dorms to promote these alternatives.  While some students attend these events, many, like 19 year old sophomore Yani Anastis, are skeptical.

“Kids are definitely not going to do that,” said Anastis, who lives in the Currier residence hall.  He doesn’t believe there are many activities at the dorm that could compete with going downtown to hang out on the Ped-Mall with friends on a bar crawl.

“No one wants to stay in the dorms during a Friday night, and there’s not much to do around.  It’s just kinda hard,” said Anastis.  He said he goes out to bars at least once a week , usually on the weekend.  What non-alcoholic fun could the dorms offer to keep him entertained?  “I’m not too sure,” said Anastis.  “I can’t really think of much.”

The Associated Residence Hall organization admits that it struggles to keep students interested in their events, and they’ve recently begun talking about plans to beef up their programs to keep students coming back for more.  ARH member Mark Schwenker works with all the other members of ARH and the student governments in each residence hall.  He says ARH members have started to talk about the 21 ordinance, and they are trying to create a contingency plan if it passes next week.

“ARH is working with all of the individual hall governments on preparing for the 21 ordinance. Discussion with any others outside of residence hall government has not occurred,” said Schwenker.

The Next Course of Action

While the Associated Residence Halls hasn’t actually sought the advice of students outside their group, there are flyers being distributed at the residence halls’ dining facilities encouraging students to get involved in ARH, and to become members.  Students I talked to had ideas, but they were not positive these would make any sort of difference in terms of curbing the appeal of a house party with alcohol.  “Maybe more movies, cause back home we’d do that.  I don’t know – it’s Iowa –  so people are going to go around the rules,” says Samantha Nasca, an under-age student who lives in Rienow Hall.

The residence halls coordinators are well aware that students will still leave the dorms if the 21 ordinance is passed and find a way to party the night away with an alcoholic beverage in hand.  But with a “zero tolerance” of alcohol in dorm rooms, the ARH’s Schwenker says they will continue issuing fines to students who break the rules.  The dorms are committed to being “dry.”

The Plan So Far

While ARH is just beginning to consider what to do in order to offer alternative activities for students, it may be too early to say what will actually happen.  “One idea is to provide more late-night events for residents going from about 11pm-2am,” said Schwenker.  ARH believes that if students are able to have an enjoyable time at an event that goes later into the night, there won’t be as much interest in leaving the dorms to go looking for other activities in Iowa City.

However, students are doubtful about any plans the dorms come up with.  “Nothing’s going to top going out,” said freshman Hannah Thompson, who lives in Rienow.  When asked how to appeal to students like Hannah, who opt for Iowa City’s night life over the residence hall events, Schwenker said, “I ask how can we make it interesting.  ARH is asking itself, ‘what makes residents want to go downtown?’”

Looking Ahead

The ARH is also aware that it needs more money to sponsor events that are more frequent and consistently fun for students.  How to raise those funds is another problem.  Ideas include reallocating housing contract money, or even applying alcohol fines to sponsor “dry” social events.   However, students seem ambivalent towards the efforts made by ARH.

The Iowa City City council’s final reading of the 21 ordinance is scheduled for Thursday, April 6.  If it passes, it goes into effect June 1.  However, it could be repealed later next fall.   Dorm resident Samantha Nasca was clear.  “I hope it gets repealed in November,” she said.

February 18, 2010

Kate Callahan – More than a student

Being a college student is stressful as it is. With papers and exams continuously coming our way, what more could we fit into with just 24 hours in a day? Sophomore Kate Callahan takes full advantage of what she can manage. Not only is she trying to keep up with her social life by taking 14 semester hours, she also maintains a part-time job, participates in many extra curricular activities on campus, and also has the time management skills to train for marathons.

When asked how she manages her time with training, Callahan responded, “School always comes first but I like to do my workouts in the mornings so I’m energetic throughout the day cause I usually crash at night anyways. I like to get it done and over with.”

Callahan recently ran the Chicago Marathon in October 2009 and placed a remarkable time of 4:02:41, with a broken foot, just about 20 minutes shy for qualifying for the Boston Marathon.
“Well right now, I’m training for the Madison Marathon, which is on May 30, 2010. It’s not as big as big as the Chicago Marathon but you can still qualify for Boston.”

Callahan, just like any college student, has made many sacrifices but more than a typical college student has to make.“There are times when I do my long runs, I don’t have the time or energy to go out so I kind of feel like my social life is on the rocks when I train for marathons, but these are definitely positive sacrifices.”

University of Iowa Dance Marathon the Marathon

Kate Callahan, 19

Another incentive Callahan gained for running the Chicago Marathon was being able to participate in Dance Marathon at the University of Iowa. She was able to run for “Dance Marathon the Marathon” where University of Iowa students participate in the Chicago Marathon to raise even more money for this successful organization on campus.

Gretchen Glynn, 21, also ran the Chicago Marathon under Dance Marathon the Marathon and was designated a morale captain for this past Dance Marathon. Glynn knows just as well how time-consuming this may be for a college student but “it was all worth it in the end.”

Glynn, like Callahan, plans on running marathons in the near future but doesn’t know if she’ll run another while attending school.

“It was so fun and rewarding but there was so much time I had to give with all the morale meetings, training, school, and work. Running buddies and the morale captains helped me stay motivated throughout all this, too. I’ve always wanted to run the New York City Marathon, so I’m sure I can find people to train with me around Iowa City when I have the time but for now, I think I’m done with marathons for the next couple years.”

Running around Iowa City

Callahan has always been physically active her whole life so she likes to keep her well-being her priority. She prefers running outside with those who are also into physical activity because “Iowa City is not only filled with hills and stairs on the Pentacrest, but the city is beautiful and [she] can also site see while training at the same time.”

Lydia Givens, 20, is currently enrolled in Jogging II here at the University of Iowa. She, as well, likes to maintain her physical activity whether it’s running in class or around Iowa City.

“I like working out but with work and school, I feel like I have no time to get the work out time I want. I figured since I had enough room to add a semester hour into my schedule, might as well get a physical activity course in there to make up for lost time.”

Winter training for Mad-Town

Since the Madison Marathon is only a couple months away, Callahan has been training during Iowa City’s brutal winters. When Callahan was asked what she does when snow takes over the streets, she replied, “I hate relying on the treadmill because I feel like it doesn’t have the same effect but if I have to, I usually go [to the gym] between classes, like during my breaks or before or after class. It’s just easier to go to the gym when I’m on campus rather than wasting time going back home and coming right back.”

More marathons, please.

Unlike Glynn, Callahan plans on running more marathons in the near future. Regardless of the positive and negative sacrifices she has to make, she knows it’s for her own benefit, which encourages her to keep on running.

“When I broke my foot in the Chicago Marathon, I couldn’t work out for weeks and I could feel my attitude was changing in a negative way. I didn’t know what to do with my time off because I always do workouts or something in my free time. Now that I’m in college, I feel like I need to do something to keep myself healthy – so this is the route I’ve been taking for years and I plan on keeping it this way.”

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